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How to Improve on Field Discipline


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Just as there is no evidence whatsoever that tougher sentences decrease crime, raising fines for yellow and red cards does nothing to improve on-field discipline. It merely impoverishes clubs and enriches the CCFA, especially where, as in so cases, the players concerned don't pay for their own misdemeanours anyway.

The way to make managers responsible for team discipline is for the CCFA to pay both managers or their clubs £10 every time there are no cards in a match. Conversely, the managers are also responsible for paying the fines when there are cards. There could be prizewinners at the end of the season, etc.

I bet this would work if the real objective is to reduce the number of serious offences.

If, of course, the real objective is to line ther pockets of the F.A.at the expense of the clubs they "represent", they wouldn't countenance it ?

What do forum contributors think ? :D

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EASY ANSWER FIRST; DON'T GET YOURSELF CAUTIONED OR SENT OFF IN THE FIRST PLACE AND YOU WON'T GET FINED.

ON A MORE SERIOUS NOTE THOUGH, EVERYBODY WOULD BENEFIT FROM SCHEMES THAT REWARD GOOD BEHAVIOUR ON A SEASON-LONG BASIS.

IF YOU WANT AN AWARD THAT'S WORTH SOMETHING; ASK THE REFS WHO THE BEST BEHAVED TEAMS ARE, THEY SHOULD KNOW !

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I remember being told about a club that were adding on additional club fines to CCFA fines in order to punish poor discipline, e.g. a yellow card (£8) was also punished with a £12 club fine. Apparently this reduced bookings for dissent. Unfortunately I can't tell you who it was (I can't remember) but I thought it was a pretty good idea.

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I remember being told about a club that were adding on additional club fines to CCFA fines in order to punish poor discipline, e.g. a yellow card (£8) was also punished with a £12 club fine. Apparently this reduced bookings for dissent. Unfortunately I can't tell you who it was (I can't remember) but I thought it was a pretty good idea.

I like that idea :thumbsup: I think a couple of clubs still do add a small club fine on to yellows and a bigger one on reds. Guess its also a way of helpping the club out (or pay for the ref) :P

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It's not a new idea SL but it is by far the best solution. I've been advocating it for 20 years but you know how these things work within "the powers that be". The sin bin will eventually come into footy (I believe the Irish FA proposed it to FIFA only recently) and the sooner the better. What better way for the offended team to receive immediate justice?

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The West Cornwall Sunday League have a fund that the sponsor put in a lump of money into, and any fines from the Referee's Initiative were added to it.

At the end of the season, all clubs that meet the target average score for referees' marks for the season, share the pot.

With several hundred pounds in the pot last season, there is a good incentive to keep referees' marks up.

In the Sunday League, referees are asked to mark every club out of 10 for sporting behaviour. A mark is taken off by the League for a booking, 3 for a sending off.

The clubs agree the target average score. This season's target is a challenging 8. Behaviour and respect for referees in the league is, generally, excellent.

The CCFA could run a county wide system. I would guess that they could get financial support from the F.A. or, for such an great scheme, from a major sponsor, to make it really worth while for clubs to behave.

I have long campaigned for the CCFA to reward clubs that behave. Even a letter of commendation for less than, say 10 disciplinary points. I think there's a saying about "stony ground" that would fit. (My club averages about 1.5 disciplinary points per season.)

It is a well understood principle that praise and rewards work much better than condemnation and punishment. Unfortunately the ethos in football is always to punish and rarely to praise. I fear that is part of the reason why this wonderful game has this dreadful component of poor discipline and a lack of respect for authority.

Which brings me on to the "Respect" campaign. I'm afraid this comes into the chocolate teapot category. Surprisingly for football, there are no clearly defined sanctions for clubs failing to comply and certainly no rewards for exemplary behaviour.

In a similar vein, I seem to remember the County Chairman sending out a laminated (no relation) letter asking clubs not to abuse referees and to avoid swearing. Well meant, but not terribly effective.

"Sin bin" would work.

Maybe they could try another trial of the 10 yard rule without the ridiculous condition that the referee must caution a player if he moves the play on 10 yards.

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Guest Sport Lover

I know its not a new idea I was being ironic.

Its the simpliest and easiest solution. Far to clever an idea for Fifa, Uefa or the FA.

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There will always be administrative reasons why good ideas from the grassroots of the game will not be accepted or are being proposed at the wrong time.

That is why I would like to see the direct action in Cornwall to challenge the power of UEFA and FIFA, organisations devoted to profit, not to the proletariats they tax.

When you see the salary of Blatter, Platini, Ericson, Capello, Mawhinney (ex-Tory cabinet minister) and the other officers, you jknow where your fines are going !

If I ran the CCFA I would declare UDI from England and Europe..... :c: :drink:

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Guest Cornishdave1980

All very acceptable ideas but but highly impractical as it requires someone in the CCFA making a large decision.

I would like to see a trial in Cornwall were the the Rugby mentality is adopted, in which only the Captain can speak. I'm sure if a persistent trial was enforced improvements would be seen.

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I have to agree with Referee, the easiest and cheapest way is not to get cautioned or sent off that way it costs absolutely nothing. When you consider that at least 80% of on field cautions are for dissent and that must be the easiest of all to stop, all the players have to do is keep their opinions to themselves. I know some players think that we love to caution or send off players but that is not the case, for myself I like nothing better than a good game and to have no reports to write in the evening.

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