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B_D

The IFAB AGM - Laws Of The Game

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Sin bins to become reality? 

 

The 131st Annual General Meeting (AGM) of The IFAB took place today at Wembley Stadium and was chaired by Greg Clarke, Chairman of The Football Association.

The British representatives as well as FIFA’s delegation unanimously approved a future IFAB strategy, using the Laws of the Game to develop the game by focusing on fairness and integrity, increasing universality and inclusion, and embracing technology. A major initial feature of the strategy will be the behaviour of players and, in particular, the role of the captain and how her/his responsibilities could be enhanced to help improve on-field behaviour and create better communication between players and referees. Methods to tackle time-wasting will also be considered as it is an area about which many fans complain.

The members strongly supported this initiative as the next step in delivering “what football wants” following the extensive revision of the Laws of the Game. Other major areas which The IFAB will focus on include handball and a potentially fairer system for kicks from the penalty mark.

Central to the IFAB strategy is also a robust evaluation process for potential future Law changes and initiatives.

As part of the ‘what football wants’ approach, the AGM extended the “Modifications” section of the Laws allowing national football associations more freedom to modify the organisational Laws for the lower levels of football e.g. number of substitutions and duration of play, to help them develop their domestic football by encouraging more people to take part. National football associations will decide at which levels the modifications are applied in their domestic football. This does not include competitions involving the first team of clubs in the top division or senior ‘A’ international teams.

Additionally, as part of “Modifications”, the proposals to allow temporary dismissals (sin bins) for yellow card offences were approved for youth, grassroots and disability football, as it is the case for return substitutions.

The AGM also approved the use of electronic communication systems in the technical area for player welfare and safety, acknowledging the importance of technology in assessing potential injuries with the help of medical data and video material.

On the topic of video assistant referees (VARs), the AGM was updated on the first phase of experiments, including reports from the workshops and more than 20 test matches organised to test the VAR protocol which was approved one year ago. The members also received detailed information on the key learning areas which will be incorporated into the ‘live’ experiments starting in almost 20 competitions from around the world in 2017.

The ‘success’ of the change from a red to yellow card for a penalty awarded for the denial of a goal-scoring opportunity if there was an attempt to play the ball, led the members to extend the principle by removing a yellow card for a penalty kick awarded for a ‘stopping a promising attack’ if the offence was an attempt to play the ball.

The AGM also approved the development of the first minimum safety standard for electronic performance and tracking systems (EPTS) which will regulate the safety of devices worn by players on the field of play.

The IFAB members (the football associations of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, as well as FIFA, representing the other 207 national associations) take turns to host the AGM in rotation. Any decision requires a majority of six out of eight votes at the AGM.

The decisions taken at last year’s IFAB AGM are available 
here.

The modifications to the Laws of the Game made at today’s AGM will come into effect on 1 June 2017, except for competitions which have started before that date.

The 132nd Annual General Meeting will be hosted by FIFA in February or March 2018

 

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I think referees and assistants in the League should have mics like in rugby so every word can be heard and punishments dished out for those who give too much lip.

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27 minutes ago, Willow Tree said:

I think referees and assistants in the League should have mics like in rugby so every word can be heard and punishments dished out for those who give too much lip.

This has been suggested before but TV companies don't want the language on TV or to have to delay the game going to air by 20 seconds or so.

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Grassroots rugby referees use them and they seem to work well. Only issue is, a decent set costs in excess of a thousand pound. 

I don't agree with more powers to the captains.

Sin Bins would be good but a nightmare to control.

I don't agree with withdrawing a yellow card in the penalty area for stopping a promising attack (although this is dependent on intent).  If it's a clear cut foul which is awarded a yellow card anywhere else on the pitch, it shouldn't be withdrawn. The idea to stop a red in the area was to prevent the triple jeopardy situation. Withdrawing a yellow card has no effect. 

 

 

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In the leagues that use rolling subs, can a referee instruct a team to withdraw a player? I've seen it done in friendlies when a referee will ask a team to sub a player to give him time to cool off. If they can, that's about as near to a sin bin as it can get at this level.

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Instruct, no. We can advise, many do so. 

Sin Bin would work if you had a fourth official or an assistant with a separate watch who could pay attention to it.

Most referees wear two watches as it is, you'd have to have an extra watch per player for this to work. 

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16 minutes ago, B_D said:

Instruct, no. We can advise, many do so. 

Sin Bin would work if you had a fourth official or an assistant with a separate watch who could pay attention to it.

Most referees wear two watches as it is, you'd have to have an extra watch per player for this to work. 

Advising is a good way of doing it. Watching Madron earlier in the season, one of their players recused himself in the first half as he feared he would end up getting sent off. He went off to cool down. I'm not sure if he came back on but by advising a team to take off a player for a period of time (unspecified) can help a game flow.

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10 hours ago, B_D said:

Instruct, no. We can advise, many do so. 

Sin Bin would work if you had a fourth official or an assistant with a separate watch who could pay attention to it.

Most referees wear two watches as it is, you'd have to have an extra watch per player for this to work. 

I don't agree. How many sin bins would there actually be? Note down the time and the players will remind you when the time is almost up anyway.

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We'll have to see. There'll be many arguments for and against. Imagine the stick we'll get when we issue a yellow or a red "no you should be using the sin bin"... I recon it would be good if it's managed.

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Only concern is ref  may  have trouble if more than one player is sin bined  and are due out at different times. Has to concentrate on running game is hard enough. At top level no problem as it will give fourth official something to do

 

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