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Increasingly modern professional football (and it is permeating down) is inhabited by people using scientific sounding terms, the main aim of these appears to be make them sound like technical experts on what is essentially a pretty simple game, and of a higher intellect than the rest of us. Here are a few terms that wind me up;

Delivery- used to be called a cross, still should be . It's not a parcel or a pizza.

Transition- in plain English, giving the ball away.

Pressing- or in old money " closing down the player with the ball." Pressing is what you do to a pair of trousers before you go out.

There are loads more out there, what sayings annoy other people?

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What a coincidence Way of , I was going to post the same thing last week  . 

In  normal  everyday life  people calling men and women " guys " , constantly saying " wow " , ignoring the verb and saying " like "  and answering a question with " absolutely " does that mean " yes " or " no "  and " amazing " when its not .

In football , I agree with you  , PLUS   " a quality ball or pass "  good quality or poor quality ? . " unbelievable "  ?  " he'll be disappointed with that "   " from the get go " what's wrong with from the start or beginning ? 

In my other sport motorsport the one thing among others , that irritate me is that all over the world race circuits have some lovely names for corners and straights  , Dingle Dell  " La Source hairpin " Aqau Mineralle  etc . But now commentators have adopted the slovenly American style of saying " turn one , turn 2 " etc .  

Excuse my miserable post but 4 hours of laying under HGV  trailers with a steam cleaner this morning has blunted my tolerance of the ruining of our grammar  a bit plus I won't get down to Cornwall and watch Argyle with the grandchidren this season 

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Not really a subject for a football forum Older  but my thoughts are , yes language does develop BUT  !!!! just to make a point on one instance of modern speech . When many people are now in the habit of saying " I was like "  it has no meaning , it doesn't explain what they did . In other words did they say it , think it or do it . How many years did our generation struggle with verbs , nouns , adjectives etc Older ?  I know I certainly  did . They are the basis of the English language and half been for many years . It some ways they are  much like pie r squared  or similar formula's .  How can you give evidence in a court or tribunal  and say he was like instead  of he said   or he was wearing " like a red coat " . Just my opinion  and I'll be outvoted 

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14 hours ago, fenman said:

Not really a subject for a football forum Older  but my thoughts are , yes language does develop BUT  !!!! just to make a point on one instance of modern speech . When many people are now in the habit of saying " I was like "  it has no meaning , it doesn't explain what they did . In other words did they say it , think it or do it . How many years did our generation struggle with verbs , nouns , adjectives etc Older ?  I know I certainly  did . They are the basis of the English language and half been for many years . It some ways they are  much like pie r squared  or similar formula's .  How can you give evidence in a court or tribunal  and say he was like instead  of he said   or he was wearing " like a red coat " . Just my opinion  and I'll be outvoted 

Out voted - no sir. Spot on again fenman. Others I dislike are  - ''taking one for the team'' and ''playing or ''waiting for the foul''. What crumb brain waits to be fouled or to feel the touch  - in order to cheat by diving ?! 

What ever happened to our language when a simple question ''how are you'' draws the answer ''good'' or ''I'm cool'' ? You didn't ask him/her are you bad, good, hot or cold. Another word that has crept in that annoys me is ''wicked'' when they mean great, good or well.

15 hours ago, TheolderIgetthebetterIwas said:

Languages develop the same as technology...progress and unstoppable. 

Some youngsters these days are just as well to be from another planet, but, they understand it.

I'd have to question using the word 'progress' there older sir - but at the moment it certainly seems unstoppable.

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It's like the new saying for something that's good..."its sick" go figure that out!

Progress perhaps not...but an evolving language is unstoppable. 

The English language is the most descriptive and accurate in the world, but, many words have been taken from others to develop it.

When spoken or written our language is a joy...but it is changing and that is not going to stop.

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3 hours ago, Keith B said:

Out voted - no sir. Spot on again fenman. Others I dislike are  - ''taking one for the team'' and ''playing or ''waiting for the foul''. What crumb brain waits to be fouled or to feel the touch  - in order to cheat by diving ?! 

What ever happened to our language when a simple question ''how are you'' draws the answer ''good'' or ''I'm cool'' ? You didn't ask him/her are you bad, good, hot or cold. Another word that has crept in that annoys me is ''wicked'' when they mean great, good or well.

I'd have to question using the word 'progress' there older sir - but at the moment it certainly seems unstoppable.

Verily sir, though doth speaketh with a wisened tongue.

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Another phrase that's used a lot by pundits and the media  is " pub football " or " Sunday league football " . Don't these " experts  "realise that there is more football played in lower level football  on Saturdays  than just the Football league . ?  Sunday league football is ( I think )   somewhat minor in comparison ,  in terms of teams and leagues  .  In actual fact the Premiership could almost be regarded as " Sunday league  " football now with the pandering to television income .    What does pub football mean exactly  ? .

4 comments ? 

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4 hours ago, fenman said:

Another phrase that's used a lot by pundits and the media  is " pub football " or " Sunday league football " . Don't these " experts  "realise that there is more football played in lower level football  on Saturdays  than just the Football league . ?  Sunday league football is ( I think )   somewhat minor in comparison ,  in terms of teams and leagues  .  In actual fact the Premiership could almost be regarded as " Sunday league  " football now with the pandering to television income .    What does pub football mean exactly  ? .

4 comments ? 

Similar to the patronising comments towards the non league game at FA Cup time. They are usually referred to as plucky amateurs and almost regarded as a few builders and factory workers that were rounded up in the preceding days, and can only manage a direct and physical style of play. It must surprise them to see these players pass the ball around on a decent pitch. Most players at national league level are full time pros, and those at immediate levels below that usually fit jobs around twice a week training sessions. But I guess that acknowledging this would ruin the "magic of the cup" narrative.

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Towards the end of my apprenticeship before I went away to sea in the early 60's, I played in goal for a firm of bookmakers. A friend of mine worked for a bookmakers in Bournemouth and we met over a pint (or two) in a pub in the town. It was good fun and played by blokes who, ok they were not really fit, in terms of the real meaning of the word, but none the less it was played with enthusiasm and no small amounts of ball skill. Games were arranged by phone calls, there was no official league (that I knew of or remember) but teams always turned up and everyone enjoyed it, even if you'd lost the match. Darren would have had a heart attack if he'd seen the referees in action.

Great times if not hard, especially if you'd played the day before for a league team. Great days. My friend went on to manage the firm, opening other branch's - well you never see a poor bookmaker do you !  

 

 

Edited by Keith B
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14 hours ago, Keith B said:

Towards the end of my apprenticeship before I went away to sea in the early 60's, I played in goal for a firm of bookmakers. A friend of mine worked for a bookmakers in Bournemouth and we met over a pint (or two) in a pub in the town. It was good fun and played by blokes who, ok they were not really fit, in terms of the real meaning of the word, but none the less it was played with enthusiasm and no small amounts of ball skill. Games were arranged by phone calls, there was no official league (that I knew of or remember) but teams always turned up and everyone enjoyed it, even if you'd lost the match. Darren would have had a heart attack if he'd seen the referees in action.

Great times if not hard, especially if you'd played the day before for a league team. Great days. My friend went on to manage the firm, opening other branch's - well you never see a poor bookmaker do you !  

 

 

My Grandad (who enjoyed a dabble on the gee gees) told me that the only thing you need to know about bookies is that there are multiple windows for placing a bet, and only one for paying out winnings.

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On 28/03/2021 at 22:24, Way Of The Park said:

My Grandad (who enjoyed a dabble on the gee gees) told me that the only thing you need to know about bookies is that there are multiple windows for placing a bet, and only one for paying out winnings.

A sage gentleman your Grandad sir. 

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On 27/03/2021 at 15:38, Way Of The Park said:

Similar to the patronising comments towards the non league game at FA Cup time. They are usually referred to as plucky amateurs and almost regarded as a few builders and factory workers that were rounded up in the preceding days, and can only manage a direct and physical style of play. It must surprise them to see these players pass the ball around on a decent pitch. Most players at national league level are full time pros, and those at immediate levels below that usually fit jobs around twice a week training sessions. But I guess that acknowledging this would ruin the "magic of the cup" narrative.

Brian Clough told his teams when playing lower league opposition that on their day the part timers could be as good as them. It's just inconsistency that means they're playing several  leagues below 

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2 hours ago, Brianmooreshead said:

Brian Clough told his teams when playing lower league opposition that on their day the part timers could be as good as them. It's just inconsistency that means they're playing several  leagues below 

Would agree with that. Have seen plenty of footballers locally who had professional level talent, but lacked consistency and, very importantly, the ability to absorb coaching and tactics and keep applying it in match situations.

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Clough's autobiography and biographys are a good read. Humorous and a great spotlight on a great man of football. Great player in his time and didn't suffer fools. Sadly he had a big drink problem towards the end of his life. His son Nigel, also a great ex player, is currently managing Mansfield Town.

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14 hours ago, Keith B said:

Clough's autobiography and biographys are a good read. Humorous and a great spotlight on a great man of football. Great player in his time and didn't suffer fools. Sadly he had a big drink problem towards the end of his life. His son Nigel, also a great ex player, is currently managing Mansfield Town.

The Damned United was on TV the other night. A superb portrayal of Brian Clough's 44 days at Leeds United. This spell can possibly be used as a counter to Clough being offered up as the best manager England never had. He was at his best working with uncut gems and cast offs such as Kenny Burns, John Robertson, John McGovern and Roy McFarland. His treatment of players such as Johnny Giles and Billy Bremner at Leeds,  Martin O'Neill and Stan Bowles at Forest illustrates how he wasn't great at dealing with big personalities and established players.  Clough, possibly like Arsene Wenger, probably burnt his legacy by going on for too long.

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4 hours ago, Way Of The Park said:

The Damned United was on TV the other night. A superb portrayal of Brian Clough's 44 days at Leeds United. This spell can possibly be used as a counter to Clough being offered up as the best manager England never had. He was at his best working with uncut gems and cast offs such as Kenny Burns, John Robertson, John McGovern and Roy McFarland. His treatment of players such as Johnny Giles and Billy Bremner at Leeds,  Martin O'Neill and Stan Bowles at Forest illustrates how he wasn't great at dealing with big personalities and established players.  Clough, possibly like Arsene Wenger, probably burnt his legacy by going on for too long.

Your final paragraph WOTP - I think you could be right. 

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On 01/04/2021 at 14:08, Keith B said:

Your final paragraph WOTP - I think you could be right. 

 

On 01/04/2021 at 14:08, Keith B said:

Your final paragraph WOTP - I think you could be right. 

That said Sir Alex at Man U went on for many years.

So called ''player power'' can be a damaging thing - if the players coming in don't like the manager, that can become a problem. I think that when Jose returned to Chelsea for a second spell, the players making up the squad then didn't like him and that was the end for him. Awkward thing too, is that coming back to a team and players that you didn't bring in, can cause problems if you wouldn't have bought some of them.

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Fan power is also a damaging thing . Ipswich Town were once a top team , had a good run in Europe in the late 70's .They gradually declined  and now languish in the lower reaches of division 1 along with Plymouth . 3 seasons ago  I went to Ipswich to watch them against Wolves in the Championship . I couldn't believe it , myself and my son and grandson sat   in a huge empty space in a magnificent stadium  . There were only 11000 fans there , now bear in mind that they were playing against the champions elect  and the nearest  top team fan base wise is Norwich some 40 miles away . The fans didn't like Mick McArthey  as their manager , they didn't like his style of football  so they didn't watch their team . Eventually  he was sacked because of fan pressure , Paul Lambert ( co- incidently also an ex Wolves manager ) took over  with great success , they've been relegated to division 2 . Mick  ,the manager they didn't  rate at all has taken over at Cardiff City who were struggling  in the Championship and they've rocketed up the table to the brink of the play offs . 

Speaking of fan power , one of the most entertaining programmes on Radio Norfolk is the after match phone in  following Norwich's games . Why Norwich City pay Daniel Farka  a big wage is beyond me . Granted he's got Norwich  virtually back in the Premiership , but there are loads of people who phone in and complain about his tactics  and how poor the players are , I'm sure these people could do a better job than he does . I'm sure other teams have the same " expert "  pundits .

One  expert fans comments a few weeks ago highlighted some peoples football knowledge . They were discussing  top players born in Norfolk , Mike Bailey , Maurice Norman , Clive Woods and several others . The presenter said " of course we also had Matthew Upson  " the man on the line said " who  , I've never bloody heard of him , he couldn't have been a lot of good , who did he play for "?  The presenter said " well nobody of note , Arsenal  and England , he played in the World Cup for England " . " No never heard of  him , why didn't he play for Norwich if he was any bloody good "  , long delay while the presenters stopped laughing . Great entertainment these phone in fans ' but a bad advert for Norfolk people .

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