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Thanks for the info re, modern sports pitches , there were one or two of us up here interested in their composition as well as my family who go  to Plymouth with me  ( 5 0f us ) .Interesting about the Dutch  providing the surface at Wembley

Clever people the Dutch , a much underrated nation  , they are world experts in marine salvage and marine construction  as well as drainage . We have a great Dutch influence up here although a lot of local don't realise it . Vermylan ,a Dutch engineer drained the East Anglian Fens in the middle ages  and many Dutch people settled in Norwich following several religious upheavals in the Low Countries in the Middle Ages . Just a boring bit of trivia for die hard football geeks ., the reason that  Norwich City are known as " The Canaries " is that , again in the middle ages ,  various people from the Low countries who found  refuge in Norwich were well known for breeding canaries  . You never know it could be a quiz question !!! A lot of the buildings in the East part of the Broads  and Lincolnshire are based on Dutch design  and we have several  farming families of Dutch decent , Van Poortfleet  , Van Nel Van Driver  ( sorry couldn't resist that one )

Actually it would be closer for me to go to a game in Amsterdam than trek all the way down to Plymouth . Having said that a group of lads fly out to Germany from Norwich to watch games in Bonn and Cologne  , they say the tickets are cheaper and the facilities are good .

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5 hours ago, fenman said:

Thanks for the info re, modern sports pitches , there were one or two of us up here interested in their composition as well as my family who go  to Plymouth with me  ( 5 0f us ) .Interesting about the Dutch  providing the surface at Wembley

Clever people the Dutch , a much underrated nation  , they are world experts in marine salvage and marine construction  as well as drainage . We have a great Dutch influence up here although a lot of local don't realise it . Vermylan ,a Dutch engineer drained the East Anglian Fens in the middle ages  and many Dutch people settled in Norwich following several religious upheavals in the Low Countries in the Middle Ages . Just a boring bit of trivia for die hard football geeks ., the reason that  Norwich City are known as " The Canaries " is that , again in the middle ages ,  various people from the Low countries who found  refuge in Norwich were well known for breeding canaries  . You never know it could be a quiz question !!! A lot of the buildings in the East part of the Broads  and Lincolnshire are based on Dutch design  and we have several  farming families of Dutch decent , Van Poortfleet  , Van Nel Van Driver  ( sorry couldn't resist that one )

Actually it would be closer for me to go to a game in Amsterdam than trek all the way down to Plymouth . Having said that a group of lads fly out to Germany from Norwich to watch games in Bonn and Cologne  , they say the tickets are cheaper and the facilities are good .

Superb Fenman.

As the original title of this  thread suggested....INTERESTING.

Way more interesting than the drivel I’ve been spouting .

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Nonsense Mr. Green ,  I think everybody who contributes to the forum as a whole have something relevant to say . This subject itself , with contributions from Older and yourself have opened many peoples eyes to aspects of ground maintenance  that many of us gave very little thought to before  . The information about the construction of sports fields was a subject that several of my friends have pondered for a while . We tend to look at the action ( or lack of ) on the pitch but pay little regard to the preparation to make the playing surface as good as possible . Also it is nice to reminisce about pitches we played on in the past compared to today . My family and I have often noted the speed in which the machinery is onto the pitch at the end of the game at Plymouth, now we know why . As Keith B would agree with me from our old professions , " you can't have enough knowledge "

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10 hours ago, fenman said:

Nonsense Mr. Green ,  I think everybody who contributes to the forum as a whole have something relevant to say . This subject itself , with contributions from Older and yourself have opened many peoples eyes to aspects of ground maintenance  that many of us gave very little thought to before  . The information about the construction of sports fields was a subject that several of my friends have pondered for a while . We tend to look at the action ( or lack of ) on the pitch but pay little regard to the preparation to make the playing surface as good as possible . Also it is nice to reminisce about pitches we played on in the past compared to today . My family and I have often noted the speed in which the machinery is onto the pitch at the end of the game at Plymouth, now we know why . As Keith B would agree with me from our old professions , " you can't have enough knowledge "

Spot on fenman. A good post sir.

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10mm of rain here in west cornwall.

1mm over a square M is 1 litre.

1litre weighs 1kg.

1000litres is cubic metre.

One cubic metre weighs 1 tonne.( you have to love the metric system)

10mm of rain over 1m* is 10litres of water, 7,000 litres over a pitch. Weighing 7 tonnes. When you get 300mm in a winter month, that’s a lot over water over a pitch. Any wonder games get cancelled?

Rain water also contains Nitrogen,  10mm over a hectare is somewhere around 1kg/N. Sometimes more if thundery rain.

So when you see a green up after rain, it’s obviously down to the water,   but also a little bit due to the N,  goes some way to explaining why grass grows so well in a wet summer.

 

See,  TOLD YOU Drivel 🤪🤪🤪

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Another bit of  drivel about rainwater . It can be used in a battery instead of distilled water  ( it probably is effectively distilled water ) . The transport company where I am a consultant ( see earlier post ) has used it in their fleet of lorries for years .

No rain here , a cold Easterly wind drying up the allotments . Having said that the end of April beginning of May is a tricky time as regards weather .I used to hate playing at this time of the year , I preferred the mud when everyone was as slow  as me . The pitches are usually bone hard and strong winds used to bounce the ball all over the place . That was with the old ball , goodness knows what the modern ball is like on bone hard , windy pitches .

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4 hours ago, Mrgreen said:

10mm of rain here in west cornwall.

1mm over a square M is 1 litre.

1litre weighs 1kg.

1000litres is cubic metre.

One cubic metre weighs 1 tonne.( you have to love the metric system)

10mm of rain over 1m* is 10litres of water, 7,000 litres over a pitch. Weighing 7 tonnes. When you get 300mm in a winter month, that’s a lot over water over a pitch. Any wonder games get cancelled?

Rain water also contains Nitrogen,  10mm over a hectare is somewhere around 1kg/N. Sometimes more if thundery rain.

So when you see a green up after rain, it’s obviously down to the water,   but also a little bit due to the N,  goes some way to explaining why grass grows so well in a wet summer.

 

See,  TOLD YOU Drivel 🤪🤪🤪

Yes Mrgreen. 

Nitrogen in stormwater is released due to the electrical charges on the water particles changing and releasing nitrates which are useable to the grass plant, another form of nitrification I suppose.

Remember nearly 80% of the air we breathe is nitrogen. 

I'm in west Cornwall as well...how close are you to me(?)

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A young student could learn a lot from reading these  posts . We've learnt a lot about the importance of water  and a lot about chemistry , now we are into the realms of the importance of electricity to rainfall and its effect on growing plants .

Apologies for digressing , but we learn something new every day if we take the trouble to read or listen . Several years ago I had to do North Sea survival courses  annually , you know the type of thing , strapped in a helicopter cab and dropped upside down in a water tank , and keeping calm whilst upside down , try to remember the technique for undoing the seat belts opening the window and getting out ., at the same time thinking " what am I doing here , why didn't I work in an office " ( or be a groundsman ). During the course it was explained that the reason you cannot drink sea water is that the type of salt in the sea reacts with the salt naturally already in the body  and would stop the electric current that triggers the heart muscles  to operate . I didn't realise that the human body is powered by an electric current  . What I'm saying is that we don't realise that the reaction of water , electricity and sunlight  individually or combined have a huge part in keeping us and nature going .

Perhaps a medical student or a survival expert from Culdrose could explain the salt thing a bit better than me .

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Seawater effect on grass...that can be quite interesting. 

From memory that's all about electrical changes as well, positive charges and negative charges changing on the soil particles and so on.

I think it locks up the cations (nutrients) on the soil particles...this was an awful long time ago for me!

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Can I say that there will be a number of people reading this series of posts who think  " a load of old men babbling absolute rubbish " . But !!!!!!    reading all this and absorbing it makes you realise how complex life is . I marvel at how  nature adjusts things in the way that  a carpenter would,  for instance in making  something , " it won't work like this but it will if I " . So we have water , but not all water is the same , if certain chemical changes didn't occur by reaction with something else , it would be virtually useless . Going back to my comment about wood , if all wood was the same  it wouldn't be very useful other than as a fuel or limited building uses . As it is the various types of trees give us different types of wood , flexible , hard , soft  , hard wearing etc.  which makes it invaluable . We have grass , again if there were only one type it's use would be limited .Now we learn about artificial grass woven into matting incorporating natural grass , a bit of help from humble mankind to assist it's wearing properties .

You'll have to excuse my long posts I'm in the typing and research mood ,. I'm having my first experience of journalism ., so I'm in the keyboard pounding mood . I'm writing an article about Dutch children being sent to Britain after the second world war in an effort to help them recuperate after the effects of starvation and the horror of occupation . As many came to Norfolk I'm writing and researching this for a local magazine .

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Saltwater effects on plants/soil.

I think I’m correct in saying, the MAIN reason for plant death in high salinity is desiccation. The osmotic pressure on the outside of the root is greater than that on the inside. So moisture is drawn out of the plant , so wilts and dies.

There May also be some toxicity issue with sodium and chloride, both  of which are only needed in trace amounts.

I think, also it alters, (lowers) the cationic exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil, which lessens the soils ability to supply nutrients.

I very vaguely remember from school history, that the Romans used to “poison “ the fields with salt to stop crops from growing.

If I’m incorrect, hopefully someone will put me right, so I may learn something new.

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I suppose it's a similar reaction to curing bacon and fish where they are covered in salt to draw out the moisture , your comment about the Roman times I was almost alive then !!!!!! . Seriously   though , you are probably right because there seems to be very little growing on Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah or any of the salt basins in other parts of the world , of course it could be for a different reason .

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2 hours ago, Mrgreen said:

Saltwater effects on plants/soil.

I think I’m correct in saying, the MAIN reason for plant death in high salinity is desiccation. The osmotic pressure on the outside of the root is greater than that on the inside. So moisture is drawn out of the plant , so wilts and dies.

There May also be some toxicity issue with sodium and chloride, both  of which are only needed in trace amounts.

I think, also it alters, (lowers) the cationic exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil, which lessens the soils ability to supply nutrients.

I very vaguely remember from school history, that the Romans used to “poison “ the fields with salt to stop crops from growing.

If I’m incorrect, hopefully someone will put me right, so I may learn something new.

Yes Mrgreen you jog my memory there, it is the same way weedkiller works, the osmotic pressure is so great it bursts the cell walls of the plant and fluids leak out (dessication) death then follows. 

 

Good day today, the boys came up and cracked on with the divots while I scarified x 6 and then a nice slow cut to give a very nice finish.

Still holding off on the fertiliser as the grass is doing pretty good on its own. 

Colour could be better but scarifying it to give it good air movement around the tillers will help that.

 

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While it’s nice to look at lovely green grass, I believe grass can be perfectly healthy without being luminous.

The fresh air around the base will certainly perk it up, as will the sunlight now available to the lower parts..

For those of us who do need our sward to be a “nice” colour, the main  nutrient is Iron(Fe) . An iron product applied with a “little” N will green up with little growth. The little N is needed to help iron uptake.

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One of the furlough boys on his first ever go on the mower, brushing the ground ahead of me cutting...great saver!

Also holding off (just) from putting down the fertiliser yet with the grass doing well with no donkeys running around on it...lol.

Very green where I put down the organic fertiliser to treat the dry patches we had last summer, hoping it fixes that problem...we'll see.

No pattern on the pitch as yet, just nice to let the grass stand up straight for a few weeks. 

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Nothing to post at this time, just carrying on with general maintenance,  divoting, brushing, light scarifying and a bit of seeding. 

The cutting is another thing all together, the grass is growing a treat after the rain and now this heat, could comfortably cut every 3 days with the growth spurt that's happening. Boxing off the trimmings to stop the spread of meadow grass seeds and any weeds that may be seeding as well, essential to collect the trimmings at this time of the year.

I do occasionally leave the grass fly to put a bit of nitrogen and organic material back into the soil...but not very often as to try and avoid any thatch build up.

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8 hours ago, John Mead said:

Just a quick one Dave, how does ryegrass regenerate? I recognise meadow grass when the seeds appear but never seem to see any seeds growing amongst the ryegrass!

Hello John. Rye grasses are probably not seeding just yet, they produce seed when the days are longer.

They produce seed on what is known as daughter tillers that have broken off the main plant and have rooted, the rye grass can spread this way as well, once flowered and seeded the tiller dies, stop it from seeding by cutting the flowers off and the tiller will establish itself as a new plant. 

The seeds of a rye grass are quite low down and often hidden in the leaves, but because the crown is predominantly about 5cm below ground you can mow quite low to remove them.

To get a good crop of rye grass seeds you need a cool, cold winter and long days so next month would be/maybe the time to keep an eye out for them.

Your rye grasses will have a reddish/purple base to the tillers. 

 

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To box off, or not to box off?

The professional jury is very much out on the subject. Many will say, there is no proven correlation between returning clippings, and thatch accumulation. As a personal view,  if your happy with your sward composition, and the surface is dry, and you can’t see any clippings on the surface, then I’m okay with it. It does put something back in the way of nutrients. 

Also there is some benefits to drought tolerance, and soil bug activity.  However. If, as older points out, weed seeds are prominent, or grass is wet, or your removing to much top growth in one go. Better to remove I think.

Another consideration, is in the times of little or no worn control, grass clippings are a worm food source. Better to not return clippings in autumn or winter.

 

 

John mead.... Meadow grass seed is easier to spot because it will flower at an incredibly low mowing height. Down to as low as 3mm.

It is very much an opportunist and will fill any bare space, there seems to be an abundance this year. I think down to the ground drying very quickly this spring. The plant has been put under stress and has set seed accordingly.

Rye grass usually seeds between May and September and usually at a higher height. The seed harvest usually takes place in September and is very much a miniature version of a corn harvest. I have been privileged to have a visit to limigrain seed house in France to witness it. Acres and acres of grass at seed blowing in the breeze. Mini combine comes in and cuts it. It get threshed and separated. Many farmers in the area grow grass instead of more traditional crops, such is the value.

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As you know Mrgreen a grass flower is not a true flower,  rather it pollinates by wind only, hence it it can look like a field of corn when left to grow for haylage or seed cropping. 

Of course sports varieties do not do that as have been highly hybridised to stay relatively short and seed low down.

I'm a believer in taking the trimmings off when mowing but at certain times I leave them on to gain the seeds of the ryes and clover, although after collecting the seeds I will kill the clover for the winter period.

And yes, theres a huge amount of meadow grass this year but having mowed today and boxed it off the seeding is reducing at last, probably down by 70% now...slowly winning that one I think. When the meadow grass eventually stops I will leave the arisings fly for a few weeks to give a bit of shelter from the sun and collect the beneficial seeds as previously mentioned. 

Also too much grass to leave fly at this time, 10 boxes of arisings today at a hundredweight  a pop is too much to leave on the surface, if you leave it fly all the time you really have to cut very regularly to get away with it.

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Correct me if I'm wrong on the subject of Rye grass  But ! . In recent years in East Anglia we have grown more and more Maize  ( another type of grass ?)  to be used in the electricity generating industry . I don't know how it works  but it's stored under huge rubber like sheets and then fed into a large dome like structure and electricity is produced . In the last couple of years I've noticed that there is a lot of rye grass grown . I discovered a few weeks ago that the transport firm that  I have connections with  cart this rye grass to the power station as well .  It's processed in the same way as the maize  .One of the things which surprised me is how abrasive the dried rye grass is . The insides of the tipper trailer a, shine like a new pin after carrying a load of this rye .  Bit of a pointless post I suppose , but it relieves the boredom on a cold day .

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I think they are biomass plants producing ethanol to power generators. 

Maize is high in starch so generates gas when stored and wetted generating microbe activity, seed coatings are pretty tough casings so would polish most surfaces I suspect. 

From memory a hectare of maize can produce in excess of 5 or 6 million Megawatts of electricity! 

Yes maize is a grass.

From my deepest memories there are around 9,000 species of grass...I think(?)

 

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That's it Biomass plants , there's a couple near us  , they are quite small but obviously quite effective . The maize material is quite abrasive but nowhere near as much as the rye . I'm sure it's rye grass I'm talking about  , I must ask the drivers when I return to work . I know the farmers seem to grow  more and more of it , I suppose it helps the crop rotation with sugar beet now that potato growing is  reducing  , although I don't know if maize and rye are regarded in the crop rotation system as  a cereal crop .

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1 hour ago, fenman said:

That's it Biomass plants , there's a couple near us  , they are quite small but obviously quite effective . The maize material is quite abrasive but nowhere near as much as the rye . I'm sure it's rye grass I'm talking about  , I must ask the drivers when I return to work . I know the farmers seem to grow  more and more of it , I suppose it helps the crop rotation with sugar beet now that potato growing is  reducing  , although I don't know if maize and rye are regarded in the crop rotation system as  a cereal crop .

Remember the song with bringing in rye in it(?) 

I dont know but would think the seed husk is some form of cellulose (?)

And I would imagine it is rotated the same as all other crops, sugar beet is also a biomass crop due to it's high starch content. 

 

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On 12/05/2020 at 15:48, TheolderIgetthebetterIwas said:

Finished the spot spraying today and did notice quite a few dandelions that have germinated from last year, get them early before they establish and seed.

Ryan turned up again and strimmed all the carpark and roads...excellent.

 

 

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Ryan sounds like a keeper. It’s nice to be freed up to do other stuff. 

Are the dandelions new stock, or regrowth from earlier treated plants. On close up the sward looks a little open, perfect for weed ingress. As it thickens, weeds may become less of a problem. The good AND bad with turf, is that there’s always a problem to deal with.

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No Mrgreen he's not a keeper...he's the leagues top goalscorer...lol ....I know what you mean...haha!

New plants from seed,  I've retreated all the original spraying that recovered, these are not out in the field but a foot from the railings.

The field itself is thickening up reasonably well and probably I will fertilise soon to push it on a bit for summer, I am considering a touch of iron to toughen the cell walls up for the summer sunshine. Iron is useful for helping internal osmotic pressure to maintain cell turgidity  (stiffness) and reduce transpiration ...normally called turf toughener.

If I do I will probably go for no more than 4% unless I use a liquid toughener which I can use sparingly and dilute accordingly. 

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21 hours ago, TheolderIgetthebetterIwas said:

No Mrgreen he's not a keeper...he's the leagues top goalscorer...lol ....I know what you mean...haha!

New plants from seed,  I've retreated all the original spraying that recovered, these are not out in the field but a foot from the railings.

The field itself is thickening up reasonably well and probably I will fertilise soon to push it on a bit for summer, I am considering a touch of iron to toughen the cell walls up for the summer sunshine. Iron is useful for helping internal osmotic pressure to maintain cell turgidity  (stiffness) and reduce transpiration ...normally called turf toughener.

If I do I will probably go for no more than 4% unless I use a liquid toughener which I can use sparingly and dilute accordingly. 

Embarrassingly, it took me way too long to “get” the keeper joke.

If I may be so bold as to offer an opinion. I’ve sometimes witnessed some damage to new seedlings when a liquid iron product has been applied. What appears to be similar to desiccation, and often leading to death. Certainly stay clear of anything to “hot” such as iron sulphate. Not sure whether a chelated liquid would have a similar devastating effect???

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1 minute ago, Mrgreen said:

Embarrassingly, it took me way too long to “get” the keeper joke.

If I may be so bold as to offer an opinion. I’ve sometimes witnessed some damage to new seedlings when a liquid iron product has been applied. What appears to be similar to desiccation, and often leading to death. Certainly stay clear of anything to “hot” such as iron sulphate. Not sure whether a chelated liquid would have a similar devastating effect???

Nice one buddy, if I do put a touch of iron down I will over dilute it to accommodate the young seedlings which are now at the dicotyledon stage...happy with that. 

Iron plays a big part in the control of osmotic pressure and it always amazes me the strength of the iron in some of the fertilisers, as well as the amount of nitrogen sometimes used, I always go for the lower values as in reality grass really only needs a bit of help.

I suppose it's our vanity that wants these ultra green shimmer in the sunlight pitches...I do like them mind, nothing better that a chequer board of a playing surface!

 

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So then Gents, are we all getting bored now with entertaining the masses, or giving away trade secrets for no fiscal reward?
WHAT IS GOING ON? Not a single post on this thread in 73 hours! Anyone would think you’ve got something better to do 🚜🧹‼️
I hope that you’re all staying well, look after yourselves. Lots of love - B.T.E.

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Sorry BTE we've probably all got to the stage where it's purely routine maintenance now just waiting for the go ahead to mark the pitches and put the goalposts up. Got to say from my point of view it's a little frustrating having no end product ie a match on a Saturday! However could do with a drop of rain if you have any stored somewhere, never satisfied us grounds people.

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With time on our hands I got the triple out of mothballs today, have been letting the grass grow a bit to protect it from the heat so a chance to mess around with this. 

A lot of adjustments to be made to get the cut equal across the cylinders but at least we've started it after 7 months under cover.

 

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I'll be interested if other people have had soil analysis done on their pitches in the local area. 

At Carharrack AFC our pitch is manmade not natural so it is possible soil from old mine working was used to fill it in.  Our analysis shows a high amount of Copper and Iron.  

Not including Fe (Iron) in a mix is a easy way not to add to the problem. 

PH Levels are just right but comes back as 

Soil Type: Sandy Silt Loam which would explain issues with drainage, clay type soil sticks. You can see the profile by downloading the attachment. 

 

Carharrack_AFC_Soil_Analysis.pdf

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29 minutes ago, Richard Chown said:

I'll be interested if other people have had soil analysis done on their pitches in the local area. 

At Carharrack AFC our pitch is manmade not natural so it is possible soil from old mine working was used to fill it in.  Our analysis shows a high amount of Copper and Iron.  

Not including Fe (Iron) in a mix is a easy way not to add to the problem. 

PH Levels are just right but comes back as 

Soil Type: Sandy Silt Loam which would explain issues with drainage, clay type soil sticks. You can see the profile by downloading the attachment. 

 

Carharrack_AFC_Soil_Analysis.pdf 1.31 MB · 1 download

As a general rule, the only people to benefit from a soil nutrition sample is the Fertiliser salesman!!

Nutrient lock up does occur, but rarely.

Don’t get to hung up on the minor nutrients, there is more than enough in a soil based pitch. Having played at ting tang a few times, both in wet, and dry conditions. Drainage/ Aeration, would be my main focus, rather than minor nutrition supplements.

The reason I say this, is, as I recall,  the surface went from wet to bone hard very quickly. The grass that was on the pitch always seemed pretty healthy, just a little sparse.

Feed sensibly,  preferably with an organic Fertiliser.Cut little and often. And above all,  Aerate as deep and as often as you can afford.

Having said all of that. When constructing a pitch.. PREPARATION,PREPARATION,PREPARATION. If constructed badly, you will always have a battle.

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Yes Mrgreen,  agree with all of that.

Did have a good look around over ting tang a couple of seasons ago and certainly regular cutting and aeration would do the surface a world of good.

You do have a problem with the lay of the land (topography) however, there is a lot of run off from the area above the pitch, and the drainage trench is nowhere near deep enough, I did see water running over the trench on a couple of wet days when over looking at it suggesting it is silted up therefore not working anymore. Also if you have a high silt content you need a couple of seasons with a sand dressing as well as a natural fertiliser such as a few seasons applying something like a chicken manure. 

These operations would give your pitch some good porosity encouraging rooting and so on.

It could possibly also flush some of the copper and iron out of the soil profile. 

Cant say I noticed any severe copper or iron indicators in the grass so as Mrgreen says I would not be unduly worried about the report,  the biggest concern for me would be the volume of clay silt in the sample, but as already stated keep the ground opened up to allow root development. 

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Afternoon all. Not sure how i missed all this. Great thread. Im after some help. Our pitch at St Blazey has been left a bit bobbly since the flooding. Drainage work has been carried out. Were now ready to vertidrain and re seed but we need the pitch levelled. Can any reccomend a sand supplier? Or would you just use top soil? Any help appreciated.

Regards

Paul.

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20 minutes ago, Paul said:

Afternoon all. Not sure how i missed all this. Great thread. Im after some help. Our pitch at St Blazey has been left a bit bobbly since the flooding. Drainage work has been carried out. Were now ready to vertidrain and re seed but we need the pitch levelled. Can any reccomend a sand supplier? Or would you just use top soil? Any help appreciated.

Regards

Paul.

Hello Paul. There's a quarry not far from you that does sports sand...topdress with that to level your pitch buddy.

About 40 /50 tons would be good. 

I think the number is

01726 822381 or 823695

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With no real rain in the forecast, is anybody thinking about irrigation?

While I’d be surprised if many pitches needed water to stay alive just yet, a groundsman vanity is a curious thing. No doubt the turf would respond very nicely to a little water, especially any new seedlings,  With zero play to accommodate is the extra time and cost worth it?

Height of cut could be raised and frequency reduced to ease the stresses. With this dry period seed heads and stalks will become prevalent. No problem for a rotary mower, but those with gang mowers or cylinders, a real pain. 

With the cost of water on the increase(somewhere around £2 a cubic metre) 1000ltrs  maybe a wetting agent would be useful? Put VERY simply wetting agents, make water, wetter!! These applied with a liquid seaweed spray, can have a real positive effect while using less water. Quite expensive though, and most need to be sprayed.

 

Paul.

If budgets allow, try and time all processes together. Spiking first will give the seed somewhere to go, and allow any dressings to key together with the surface, sometimes if sand is just applied to top, it will create its own layer. Better to mix(key) it to existing soil.

If it’s to be an annual event, sand is the way to go, however, if it’s a one off event, try and source a 70/30 top dressing mix. A 30 tonne load is somewhere around £1000 ( I know what your thinking. SHIT, a grand!!)

There’s a contractor down my way called Andrew  Sandow.  Sorry don’t have a number. But he’s decent. Or for materials try BHGS, formally JFC Munro’s. Make sure you speak to Andrew janman. Nobody else in there has a clue!!

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I would always seed first, spread the top dressing and then vertidrain and brush in.

Each to their own though.

£2 cubic metre(?)

Won't start watering until the grass starts to wilt, an odd spot may get a drop if needed but have left the grass grow for 10 days now to give it a bit of cover from the sun, but will give it a nip soon to remove the meadow grass seeds.

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Your'e right Older you can water as much as you like but nothing beats the rain . We had a shower during the night and plants have grown more today than in the past week in spite of  much use of watering cans on the allotment . Mind you I 'm near the allotment tap so I use a hose  rather than lugging a watering can about , one of the old boy's said he wished he'd thought of it . I told him " there's two sorts of people in the world  , those near a tap with a hose , and those  further away from a tap without a hose " .He didn't smile !!!!!

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Got the old 180 triple  up and running today, bit more adjustment needed but overall not too bad.

Ryan jumped on board and cut the pitch in 40 minutes! An hour quicker than the rotary, get it adjusted properly and the finish is quite impressive. Got the boxes for grass collecting but not the catcher plates to throw it in so thinking about having them made...don't know if I'll keep it just yet...juries out on that one at this time. 

 

Screenshot_20200522-223811_Gallery.jpg

Screenshot_20200522-223953_Gallery.jpg

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A perfectly adjusted and set cylinder mower is a thing of beauty. Certainly nice to have an option. Useful to have in the stable, if space allows. Cut often enough, and in dry conditions, boxing off is not essential. If boxes are to be used, the rear vacuum plates or needed to create vortex to throw grass forwards, or backwards for rear unit.

Question.... Do you set the stripe width with the brush, or the 180.  And do you adhere to the same stripes with every process.

The reason I ask, is that Ryan APPEARS to be travelling the wrong way down the light stripe?

 

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